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quantumvyp3r:

After 2 days of weather delays United Launch Alliance is now ready to roll out their giant Delta-IV Heavy rocket to SLC-37 for nasa's Orion EFT1 mission this December.


Updates: http://www.americaspace.com/?page_id=64931


Photo: John Studwell / AmericaSpace
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quantumvyp3r:

After 2 days of weather delays United Launch Alliance is now ready to roll out their giant Delta-IV Heavy rocket to SLC-37 for nasa's Orion EFT1 mission this December.


Updates: http://www.americaspace.com/?page_id=64931


Photo: John Studwell / AmericaSpace

utcjonesobservatory:

New Molecule Found In Space Connotes Life Origins:  
Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule — one with a branched structure — contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. Like finding a molecular needle in a cosmic haystack, astronomers have detected radio waves emitted by isopropyl cyanide. The discovery suggests that the complex molecules needed for life may have their origins in interstellar space.

Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, known as the ALMA Observatory, a group of radio telescopes funded partially through the National Science Foundation, researchers studied the gaseous star-forming region Sagittarius B2.
Astronomers from Cornell, the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and the University of Cologne (Germany) describe their discovery in the journal Science (Sept. 26.)
Organic molecules usually found in these star-forming regions consist of a single “backbone” of carbon atoms arranged in a straight chain. But the carbon structure of isopropyl cyanide branches off, making it the first interstellar detection of such a molecule, says Rob Garrod, Cornell senior research associate at the Center for Radiophysics and Space Research.
This detection opens a new frontier in the complexity of molecules that can be formed in interstellar space and that might ultimately find their way to the surfaces of planets, says Garrod. The branched carbon structure of isopropyl cyanide is a common feature in molecules that are needed for life — such as amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins. This new discovery lends weight to the idea that biologically crucial molecules, like amino acids that are commonly found in meteorites, are produced early in the process of star formation — even before planets such as Earth are formed.
Garrod, along with lead author Arnaud Belloche and Karl Menten, both of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, and Holger Müller, of the University of Cologne, sought to examine the chemical makeup of Sagittarius B2, a region close to the Milky Way’s galactic center and an area rich in complex interstellar organic molecules.
With ALMA, the group conducted a full spectral survey — looking for fingerprints of new interstellar molecules — with sensitivity and resolution 10 times greater than previous surveys.
The purpose of the ALMA Observatory is to search for cosmic origins through an array of 66 sensitive radio antennas from the high elevation and dry air of northern Chile’s Atacama Desert. The array of radio telescopes works together to form a gigantic “eye” peering into the cosmos.
"Understanding the production of organic material at the early stages of star formation is critical to piecing together the gradual progression from simple molecules to potentially life-bearing chemistry," said Belloche.
About 50 individual features for isopropyl cyanide (and 120 for normal-propyl cyanide, its straight-chain sister molecule) were identified in the ALMA spectrum of the Sagittarius B2 region. The two molecules — isopropyl cyanide and normal-propyl cyanide — are also the largest molecules yet detected in any star-forming region.
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utcjonesobservatory:

New Molecule Found In Space Connotes Life Origins:  

Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule — one with a branched structure — contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. Like finding a molecular needle in a cosmic haystack, astronomers have detected radio waves emitted by isopropyl cyanide. The discovery suggests that the complex molecules needed for life may have their origins in interstellar space.

Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, known as the ALMA Observatory, a group of radio telescopes funded partially through the National Science Foundation, researchers studied the gaseous star-forming region Sagittarius B2.

Astronomers from Cornell, the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and the University of Cologne (Germany) describe their discovery in the journal Science (Sept. 26.)

Organic molecules usually found in these star-forming regions consist of a single “backbone” of carbon atoms arranged in a straight chain. But the carbon structure of isopropyl cyanide branches off, making it the first interstellar detection of such a molecule, says Rob Garrod, Cornell senior research associate at the Center for Radiophysics and Space Research.

This detection opens a new frontier in the complexity of molecules that can be formed in interstellar space and that might ultimately find their way to the surfaces of planets, says Garrod. The branched carbon structure of isopropyl cyanide is a common feature in molecules that are needed for life — such as amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins. This new discovery lends weight to the idea that biologically crucial molecules, like amino acids that are commonly found in meteorites, are produced early in the process of star formation — even before planets such as Earth are formed.

Garrod, along with lead author Arnaud Belloche and Karl Menten, both of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, and Holger Müller, of the University of Cologne, sought to examine the chemical makeup of Sagittarius B2, a region close to the Milky Way’s galactic center and an area rich in complex interstellar organic molecules.

With ALMA, the group conducted a full spectral survey — looking for fingerprints of new interstellar molecules — with sensitivity and resolution 10 times greater than previous surveys.

The purpose of the ALMA Observatory is to search for cosmic origins through an array of 66 sensitive radio antennas from the high elevation and dry air of northern Chile’s Atacama Desert. The array of radio telescopes works together to form a gigantic “eye” peering into the cosmos.

"Understanding the production of organic material at the early stages of star formation is critical to piecing together the gradual progression from simple molecules to potentially life-bearing chemistry," said Belloche.

About 50 individual features for isopropyl cyanide (and 120 for normal-propyl cyanide, its straight-chain sister molecule) were identified in the ALMA spectrum of the Sagittarius B2 region. The two molecules — isopropyl cyanide and normal-propyl cyanide — are also the largest molecules yet detected in any star-forming region.

spaceplasma:

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most powerful particle collider, built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The LHC is designed to answer some of the most profound questions about the universe: What is the origin of mass? Why are we made of matter and not antimatter? What is dark matter made of? It could also provide important new clues about conditions in the very early universe, when the four forces of nature were rolled into one giant superforce.

  • For more information click: here

Credit: Michael Hirst

Amazing Physics …

… has changed its name to astro-physics! 

xspaceoddity:

pixiepunch:

joethought:

I’ve posted an annoying amount about India’s Mars mission already, but.

Just letting everyone know: This. really. happened.

….so adorable….just want this on my blog~

Why do I ship these two

I did not planet

ohstarstuff:

India’s first spacecraft to visit Mars has sent back one of the most incredible photos yet of the Red Planet. This image from the Mangalyaan probe was unveiled today by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). The planet’s southern ice cap is clearly visible while a huge dust storm blankets part of the northern region. The spacecraft used its Mars Color Camera to capture the amazing photo from a distance of 46,292 miles above the Red Planet. (Credit: Indian Space Research Organisation)
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ohstarstuff:

India’s first spacecraft to visit Mars has sent back one of the most incredible photos yet of the Red Planet. This image from the Mangalyaan probe was unveiled today by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). The planet’s southern ice cap is clearly visible while a huge dust storm blankets part of the northern region. The spacecraft used its Mars Color Camera to capture the amazing photo from a distance of 46,292 miles above the Red Planet.

(Credit: Indian Space Research Organisation)

spaceexp:

Milky Way Self Portrait
Source: Jordan McRae
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spaceexp:

Milky Way Self Portrait

Source: Jordan McRae

canadian-space-agency:

Another beautiful Space Vine from NASA Astronaut Reid Wiseman aboard the ISS. September 23rd 2014.

Credit: Reid Wiseman/NASA

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lonelychairsatcern:

#lonelychairsatcern chair down hidden by the cables #b186 #CERN
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lonelychairsatcern:

#lonelychairsatcern chair down hidden by the cables #b186 #CERN

rocketman1984:

Higgs Boson Explained by Cartoon
Illustrations Credit & Copyright: Jorge Cham, PHD Comics

Explanation: What is all this fuss about the Higgs boson? The physics community is abuzz that a fundamental particle expected by the largely successful Standard Model of particle physics may soon be found by the huge Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Europe. The term boson refers to a type of fundamental particle with similarities to the photon, while Higgs refers to Peter Higgs, a physicist who among others published research predicting the mechanism through which such a particle might act. The above animated cartoon explains in humorous but impressive detail why the Higgs boson is expected, and one method that the Large Hadron Collider is using to find it. Although some rumors hint that preliminary traces of the Higgs boson are already being found, even not finding this unusual particle would open the door to a new fundamental understanding of how our universe works.

cosmicauthoress:

#Repost from @astro__remy with @repostapp —- Stunning view of the North of Africa seen from the International Space Station. Image: Roscosmos #earth #earthfromabove #spaceview #space #spaceporn #Africa
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cosmicauthoress:

#Repost from @astro__remy with @repostapp —- Stunning view of the North of Africa seen from the International Space Station. Image: Roscosmos #earth #earthfromabove #spaceview #space #spaceporn #Africa